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Crazy Socks Tap :: Bandy Twist

Here we go with another Crazy Socks post. Moving into the B’s with the Bandy Twist. This clip shows parts A and B together. C contains added shuffles and will be shown separately.

Bandy Twist : A basic movement originated by Jim Bandy, a dancer of the vaudeville days.

 

With Counts: Part A.  (Basic)

1-Step R (XF of L)

and -Pivot on R for 1/2 turn R

2-Step L

3-) Repeat A

and-)

4-)

 

With Counts: Part B.  (With Ball Change)

and 1-Ball change L-R

and – Pivot on R for 1/2 turn R

2-Step L

and 3-) Reverse B

and-)

4-)

Here is the last part of the Twist with added Shuffles and Ball Changes. more rhythm just for fun, but you get the idea. I just elaborate on the phrase by adding three shuffle ball changes on the last section.

 

 

With Counts: Part C.  (With Shuffle)

1-Step R

and 2-Shuffle L fwd

and 3-Ball change L-R

and- Pivot on R for 1/2 turn R

4- Step L

 

Song: Rhumboogie by the The Andrews Sisters

Thanks for playing along!

~ McGlamorous

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Click Heels through Count

(Photo credit : Alison McGlamry)

In this set : Click Heels through Count.

 

Click Heels : Having the weight on both balls of the feet, twist heels in, striking them together.

Click Toes : Having the weight on the heels of the feet, (toes raised in the air), twist toes in, striking them together.

Clip : Striking the heel against the toe of the opposite foot or striking the the toe against the heel of the opposite foot. Derivative of the Lancaster Clog.

Clog : Clog dancing first appeared in the industrial areas of Northern England, Southwest Scotland, and South Wales. This form of dancing came into existence around 1870 and is assumed to have originated in Lancaster.

Clogs : Clogs refers to a wooden-soled shoe and heels and in their final form were made of hard maple. The sole was originally one solid piece of wood with the wooden heel attached thereto. This was rather an awkward combination of equipment to dance in and in later years, the split sole came into being. The wooden sole was attached to the welt of the sole and extended back to the instep of the foot. The wooden heel was separate and attached to the leather sole. With the development of the split sole, the dancer had the flexibility to execute much more complicated footwork.

Cluster : Usually referred to a flurry or group of tap sounds performed in rapid succession. (Not a commonly used term).

Contrast : The variation of rhythm patterns in relation to one another.

Corkscrew : A twisting movement wherein the toe of one foot is raised from the floor with the heel remaining on the floor. The toe is twisted in and out. This movement is sometimes referred to as Tanglefoot.

Counterpoint : A simple explanation of this as related to dance would be for two dances, executing different steps at the same time that would blend or contrast. A more intricate form would be for two or three dancers executing the same step with each dancer starting one beat after the other.

Counts : Refers to the number of beats to a bar or measure of music.

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Charleston through Clap

(Photo credit : Alison McGlamry)

In this set : Charleston through Clap

 

Charleston : A twisting movement turning the ties inward and then outward ; dance craze of 1925, considered to be from South Carolina. A social and performance dance, it has been revived numerous times.

Charleston Twist : With weight on the balls of both feet, heels raised, twist both heels inward and outward simultaneously.

Chasse’ : A step ball change traveling in any direction.

Chop : A step backward with the leg straight ; takes weight.

Choreography : The Art of dancing or arranging dances; first used with reference to ballet.

Chorus : A standard chorus of music contains 32 measures which is divided into four 8 measure phrases.

Chorus Line : A line of girls performing a kick routine. This type of dancing was originally called a tiller.

Chug : The chug is sometimes referred to as a buck : A forward movement accenting the heel drop. With the weight on one foot, force the heel of the foot to the floor with exaggeration, thus moving the foot forward approximately 3 inches.

Cigarette Twist : See French Twist.

Clap: Same as Hand Clap : A striking of the palms of the hands together.

 

 

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Brush Step through Chaine

(Photo credit Alison McGlamry)

In this set : Brush Step through Chaine

 

Brush Step : Forward brush step being the same as a flap. Whether forward or back, the movement can be executed in any desired rhythm pattern.

Brush Flat : Executed in exactly the same fashion as the basic brush. The difference is that the entire flat of the foot striked the floor during the pendulum movement.

Back : Same as a Chug. A forward movement accenting the heel drop. With the weight on one foot, the the free foot is raised ; force the heel of the front foot to the floor with exaggeration ; thus moving the foot forward approximately 3 inches.

Buck and Wing : Clog dance marked by winglike steps. The forerunner of the present style of rhythm tap.

Bumps : Movement that employs the hips, usually done in burlesque.

Cabriole : A beating of the calves of the legs together while in the air. Step forward on one foot, extending the free leg in the air to the front or rear, with the knee straight  jump into the air beating the calves of the legs together (crossed below the knees) and land on the foot from which the movement originally started.

Cake Walk : This was originally a form of entertainment in which a prize of cake was given for the most accomplished steps and figures in walking; later a stage dance developed from these movements.

Catch : A movement wherein the toe or heel of one foot strikes the toe or heel of the opposite foot.

Catch Step : A ball change with one foot forward of the other and starting with the back foot.

Chaine : A series of small steps linked together as executed in turns.

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Black Bottom through Brush

(Photo credit Alison McGlamry)

In this set : Black Bottom through Brush

 

Black Bottom : Dance craze of 1926 which followed the Charleston. Strictly a theatrical form of dance and rarely ever used in social dancing.

Boogie Woogie : A primitive sounding percussive style of playing the blues on the piano, characterized by a persistent bass rhythm and florid figurations of a simple melody often in contrary motion to the bass; 8 beats to the measure and written in 12 measure phrases.

Bop : A musical style accenting the off-beat.

Bounce : A medium tempo in 4/4 time.

Break : A two measure movement that follows a six measure movement to complete an eight measure phrase. Breaks are commonly associated with Time Steps but may be used in any format.

Break Out : An old term for the finish of a Time Step.

Bridge : The third eight measures of a thirty- two measure chorus. Some choruses have no bridge.

Bright : A fast 4/4 time.

Broken : An old term for a Half Break.

Brush : A one-sound kick movement, in any direction. May be executed in any direction but is basically forward or backward.

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Ball Beat through Bells

Photo credit Alison McGlamry

In this set : Ball Beat through Bells

 

Ball Beat : A dropping of the ball of the foot.

Ball Change : A changing of the weight on the balls of the feet from one foot to the other ; executed forward, to the side, or on place.

Ball Tap : Same as Tap Ball.

Bandy Turn : Same as Bandy Twist.

Bandy Twist : A basic movement originated by Jim Bandy, a dancer of the vaudeville days.

Bar : In common usage, a measure of music.

Barre : Originally intended for ballet exercises but is used extensively in modern jazz classes, character dancing and in some instances, tap classes.

Barrel Roll (or turn) : A complete turn of the body with the arms extended in a windmill fashion.

Beat : The regularly recurring and periodically accented pulse or throb which constitutes the unit of measurement in all measured music ; tempo.

Bells : A clicking of heels together while in the air .

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Terminology in Ten :: Music and Dance Terminology :: Accelerando through Back-Front

(Photo credit Alison McGlamry)

In this set : Accelerando through Back-Front

 

Accelerando : A gradual increasing of speed or tempo on music.

Accent : A stress or special emphasis on a sound. The primary accent in music refers to the first beat of each measure.

Active Foot : The free or working foot with the weight on the opposite or supporting foot.

Ad Lib : To dance as one wishes without regard to a set pattern of movements – to improvise.

Allegro : A musical term which means quick or lively.

Arsis : Weak beat, or the unaccounted part of a measure of music.

Back Flap : Same as the more commonly used term ” back brush step.”

Back Flap, Heel Drop : Same as the  more commonly used term “back brush step, heel drop.”

Balance ‘ : A basic ballet movement swaying from one foot to the other.

Back – Front : Same as a ball change.

 

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Crazy Socks Tap :: The Abe Kabbible

Here it is! I’ve been wanting to do a series of posts that follow practice since I’ve recently dusted off the old taps and started work. I also wanted to find good use of all the crazy and bright socks just sitting lonely and unused in my drawer. So….Voila. Welcome to my Crazy Socks Tap. Just as expected, it’s great fun and good exercise, and you can review technique and terminology along the way. Plus, something about rhythm just soothes the soul.

First on the list is the Abe Kabbible.  It is a theatrical term and a commonly used movement in jazz and tap dancing. I learned it as the scissor (s).

 (Theatrical Term) – A commonly used movement in tap and jazz dancing.

With counts: Part A

1-Step L (to L side)
2-Step R (XF of L)
3-Step L (to L side)
4-Heel tap R (to R side)
Reverse

Part B : With the And Count Added

And-Step L (to L side)
1-Step R (XF of L)
And-Step L (to L side)
2-Heel tap R fwd (to R side)
Reverse

Part C : With the Leap

And-Leap fwd to L ft (to L side)
1-Step R (XF of L)
And-Leap fwd to L ft (to L side)
2-Heel tap R fwd (to R side)
Reverse

Song : Beat Me Daddy Eight to the Bar by the Andrews Sisters

http://www.mcglamorous.com

Hope you enjoy playing along, and thanks for tapping with me!

~McGlamorous